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Mark Davis and Cary Wolinsky Public Opening

  • Pucker Galler 240 Newbury Street, 3rd Floor Boston, MA 02116 (map)

Both artists will attend the public opening.

Mark Davis was educated at Goddard College in Vermont. He began making jewelry in his teens and his dexterous metalwork is entirely self-taught. Initial forays into mobiles utilized the metals of his jewelry making: sterling silver, gold plating, and brass. The variety of styles and materials that Davis uses to build his mobiles has expanded dramatically over the years to create a complex and compelling body of work. In addition to moderate scale pieces of movement, color, and grace, Davis also creates large scale public and private commission pieces. Davis' works are on display in numerous private and public collections including the University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital and the Rose Museum at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Cary Wolinsky worked as a news photographer for The Boston Globe in 1968 while completing a degree in photojournalism at Boston University. Soon after graduating, Wolinsky received assignments from national publications including Natural History, Smithsonian, Newsweek, and International Wildlife. In 1972, Wolinsky began his 35-year career as a National Geographic photographer, producing picture essays in Europe, Africa, Russia, Papua New Guinea, Australia, Peru, India, China, and Japan. His photographs have been published in books and magazines throughout the world. His photographic prints have been acquired by museums and private collectors in the United States, Europe, Australia and Asia. Wolinsky co-founded of the Center for Digital Imaging Arts at Boston University and TRIIIBE, an artists collaborative. Wolinsky now works with his son Yari, a filmmaker, and his wife Babs, a graphic designer, making documentary films. Their company, Trillium Studios Films (trilliumstudios.com) produced Raise the Roof (polishsynagogue.com), a feature-length documentary, about the reconstruction of an 18th century Polish wooden synagogue. The film has been featured at more than 150 film festivals and is currently being broadcast on public television stations across the US.

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Earlier Event: November 28
Breaking The Rules