Apr
19
to May 21

Skinningrove 1982 - 84

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Brian Magor, 1983.jpeg

Skinningrove 1982 - 84

Photographs by Chris Killip

Skinningrove North Yorkshire 1982 - 84 is a series dedicated to the inhabitants and life of Skinningrove, a fishing community on the North-East coast of England. The series offers a unique documentary insight, as Skinningrove was isolated both geographically and socially. Having grown up on the Isle on Man, Killip understood their culture and was able to render his subjects with dignity and respect. These intimate portraits of Skinningrove capture a late 20th century England in the process of deindustrialization.

The exhibition is made up of 40 modern 20 x 24 inches prints, none of which have been previously exhibited in the United States.

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Ali Clift: Threads of Magic and Hagiwara Yoshinori: Mingei Renewed
Apr
27
to Jun 2

Ali Clift: Threads of Magic and Hagiwara Yoshinori: Mingei Renewed

Public Opening

Saturday, 11 May 2019, 3:00PM - 6:00PM.
Both artists will attend the public opening. Kindly RSVP to the event on Eventbrite.com.

Artist Biographies

Ali Clift’s unique and mysterious cloth paintings are delicately crafted using fabric. As a graduate of Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Clift's first cloth paintings were inspired, technically, by a picture composed of small cloth pieces on display at the MFA . Throughout her artistic career, Clift has been fascinated by the challenge of creating an authentic sense of space through the illusion of fabric. As she continues to expand her creative process, each new body of work introduces distinct subjects and a notable change in an exploration of cloth as a medium for painting. Some of the most recent works depict the beauty of nature in a surreal, narrative manner. An ardent and engaged traveler, she shares—literally and figuratively—fragments of her experiences in new environments. Clift's earlier works inspired by Mexico are featured in the book Paintings of the Last Decade: Still Life, which is the second publication featuring the artist. The first, entitled Beyond the Big Top: The Cloth Paintings and Graphic Works, explores her successful circus-themed works. Clift's work is included in public collections in New England, New York, Canada, Israel, Vietnam, and Bali. She resides in Chelsea, Massachusetts and Naples, Florida.

Hagiwara Yoshinori is the fifth generation of the Hagiwara family ceramic workshop, currently residing in Mashiko, Japan. To obtain formal training, he studied and researched at the Tochigi Prefectural Ceramics Instructional Institute. Yoshinori's work has since been selected for inclusion, and has won numerous prizes at the National Art Exhibition for multiple years. The most recent ceramics have broadened beyond his well-known persimmon glaze, and he has incorporated yellow kaki, blue nuka, and namijiro glaze into his artistic vocabulary. Creating his own expression through using these glazes, he exhibits great control in creating elegant forms. In 2014, Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry designated Hagiwara as a "Traditional Craftsman." His ceramics are included in significant public collections including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Schein Joseph Museum of Ceramic Art at Alfred University in Alfred, New York, and the Tikotin Museum of Art in Haifa, Israel.

To see the exhibition catalogues, visit www.puckergallery.com.

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May
1
to Jun 2

CREE BRUINS and SARAH HOLLIS PERRY, Reflecting (Then and Now)

Kingston Gallery
450 Harrison Ave.
Unit 43
Boston, MA 02118

(617) 423-4113

W-F (12:00 - 5:00 pm, and by appointment)

Opening Reception: Friday, May 3, 5-8pm


Gallery member Cree Bruins and visiting artist Sarah Hollis Perry present a collaboration in the Kingston Project Space titled, Reflecting (Then and Now). The project continues one started in 2017 for a Boston Sculptors Gallery invitational in honor of their former teacher, Joyce McDaniel. Throughout their careers each artist has worked extensively with film and alternate photographic technologies. With this show they’ve come together, reusing the all-but-obsolete materials of earlier photographic production as their medium to create an installation of physical structures and digital images.

Cree Bruins and Sarah Hollis Perry  Reflecting  (detail), wood, mirrored acrylic, size variable, 2019

Cree Bruins and Sarah Hollis Perry
Reflecting (detail), wood, mirrored acrylic, size variable, 2019

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May
1
to Jun 2

Lynda Schlosberg, Frequency Tuning

LYNDA SCHLOSBERG, Frequency Tuning

Kingston Gallery
450 Harrison Ave.
Unit 43
Boston MA 02118

(617) 423-4113

May 1 - June 2, 2019 (W-F 12:00-5:00pm and by appointment)

Opening Reception: Friday, May 3, 5-8pm

Lynda Schlosberg’s current series of intricately layered paintings, Frequency Tuning, visually explores the crossing point between physical and non-physical worlds. Her large, vibrant paintings are inspired by both natural and unnatural elements, evoking satellite images of rivers, trees, glaciers and chasms with a multitude of lines and dots across the canvas atop fluid pools of color. Schlosberg’s intricate and complex paintings are inspired by quantum theories and philosophies questioning whether it’s possible to adjust one’s frequency-tuning abilities to move easily between worlds, or to experience both at the same time, “We experience the world with our intellect and physical senses, yet there is also an invisible sea of energy beyond our awareness that surrounds, connects, and influences us.” Working with both metaphysical principles and philosophical ideas Schlosberg presents her work as a macrocosm where all things are intermingled, out of which anything is possible.

http://www.kingstongallery.com/

Lynda Schlosberg,  Tuning In  (detail), acrylic on panel, 40 x 30 inches, 2019

Lynda Schlosberg, Tuning In (detail), acrylic on panel, 40 x 30 inches, 2019

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Secrets of the Unseen
May
1
to Jun 2

Secrets of the Unseen

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Marie Craig and Allison Maria Rodriguez

Through installation, video, photography, animation, drawing and performance, “Secrets of the Unseen” explores the possibilities of transcendence and rebirth through a conventionally unrecognized, hidden power. Craig and Rodriguez draw attention to the manner in which this power is linked to the survival instincts of all lifeforms, highlighting that existence is both delicate and ferocious. This exhibition illustrates that the foundation for a shared evolution could be found in the smallest, and perhaps most unlikely, of places.

Reception: Friday, May 3, 2019, 6–8 p.m.

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Jamal Thorne: Timestream Muckery
Apr
3
to Apr 28

Jamal Thorne: Timestream Muckery

Kingston Gallery
450 Harrison Ave.
Unit 43
Boston, MA 02118

(617) 423-4113

W-F (12:00 - 5:00 pm and by appointment)

Opening Reception: April 5, 5:00 - 8:00pm

Jamal Thorne’s Timestream Muckery references popular culture, religious iconography, and symbolism to create images multi-layered with identity and personal truths. Thick with layers of drawing and mixed-media, his work serves as a documentation of personal journeys into the past, armed with current knowledge of how those past events changed the future, affecting the present moment where the artist finds himself today. Weaving visuals of iconic moments in the the civil rights movement into the physical layers of his collages, Thorne reflects on how the inclusion of contemporary objects and figures might have changed the experience of those historical moments. With layers composed of tape and paint, Thorne draws, paints, peels, tears, and builds his canvases. As a new layer covers the previous one, time moves forward, and new events occur. As in history or memory, some elements are lost, while others are preserved as indelible impressions in time.

http://www.kingstongallery.com/

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Yana Payusova: Revolutions
Mar
15
to Apr 16

Yana Payusova: Revolutions

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Image: Yana Payusova, Origins, Revolutions series, ceramic, 20 x 12 x 9 inches, 2018

Revolutions explores the dynamics of power and gender through vivid imagery painted onto large ceramic vessels. Even though this series is very much rooted in the tradition of the narrative ceramic vessel, these forms deconstruct the functionality of a decorative utilitarian receptacle. The vessel functions as a circular canvas whose interior and exterior spaces are activated with imagery examining the ever-changing roles of women and cultural gender norms. It brings into question constructions of power in relation to expectations of behavior and beauty. Complexities of sexuality, motherhood, and ageing are revealed with the vessels slowly rotating on pedestals, creating a continually moving and overlapping progression of imagery of revolving juxtapositions, nuanced angles, and sliding points of view.

The renderings on the surfaces are informed by Akio Takamori sculptures, Soviet propaganda posters, the early Will Eisner comics, the wordless woodcut novels of the 1920s, the Ancient Greek orgy cups and the Japanese Ukiyo-e prints. The clay forms are hand-built using the coil technique, then bisque-fired before they are painted with underglazes in layers, and scratched into the painted surface. The color palette is purposely restricted to one traditionally used in printmaking: most of the imagery is black and white, an homage to the stark language of the woodcut print. Red is also added as an essential primary color.

The tropes and allusions presented in the works cannot be separated from the ongoing debate over female body rights concerning birth/abortion, circumcision, body coverage/exposure, contraception, and obligations within matrimony. Throughout history, the unclothed female figure has carried the baggage of objectification, voyeurism, exoticism, desire, and struggle for power and control.

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Samuel Bak Ner Ot II
Mar
9
to Apr 21

Samuel Bak Ner Ot II

Public Opening

Saturday, 9 March 2019, 3:00PM - 6:00PM
The artist will attend the public opening. Kindly RSVP to the event on Eventbrite.com.

Artist Biography

Samuel Bak was born in 1933 in Vilna, Poland, at a crucial moment in modern history. From 1940 to 1944, Vilna was under Soviet and then German occupation. Bak’s artistic talent was first recognized during an exhibition of his work in the Ghetto of Vilna when he was nine years old. While he and his mother survived, his father and four grandparents all perished at the hands of the Nazis. At the end of World War II, he fled with his mother to the Landsberg Displaced Persons Camp, where he enrolled in painting lessons at the Blocherer School in Munich. In 1948, they immigrated to the newly established state of Israel. He studied at the Bezalel Art School in Jerusalem and completed his mandatory service in the Israeli army. In 1956 he went to Paris to continue his education at the École des Beaux Arts. He received a grant from the America-Israel Cultural Foundation to pursue his artistic studies. In 1959, he moved to Rome where his first exhibition of abstract paintings was met with considerable success. In 1961, he was invited to exhibit at the “Carnegie International” in Pittsburg, followed by solo exhibitions at the Jerusalem and Tel Aviv Museums in 1963.

It was subsequent to these exhibitions that a major change in his art occurred. There was a distinct shift from abstract forms to a metaphysical figurative means of expression. Ultimately, this transformation crystallized into his present pictorial language. Bak’s work weaves together personal history and Jewish history to articulate an iconography of his Holocaust experience. Across seven decades of artistic production, Samuel Bak has explored and reworked a set of metaphors, a visual grammar, and vocabulary that ultimately privileges questions. His art depicts a world destroyed, and yet provisionally pieced back together, and preserves memory of the twentieth-century ruination of Jewish life and culture by way of an artistic passion and precision that stubbornly announces the creativity of the human spirit.

Since 1959, the artist has had numerous exhibitions in major museums, galleries, and universities throughout Europe, Israel, and the United States, including retrospectives at Yad Vashem Museum in Jerusalem, and the South African Jewish Museum in Cape Town. He has lived and worked in Tel Aviv, Paris, Rome, New York, and Lausanne. In 1993, he settled in Massachusetts and became an American citizen. Bak has been the subject of numerous articles, scholarly works, and eighteen books; most notably a 400-page monograph entitled Between Worlds. In 2001 he published his touching memoir, Painted in Words, which has been translated into several languages. He has also been the subject of two documentary films and was the recipient of the 2002 German Herkomer Cultural Prize. Samuel Bak has received honorary doctorate degrees from the University of New Hampshire in Durham, Seton Hill University in Greenburg, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts College of Art in Boston.

In 2017, The Samuel Bak Museum opened in the city of the artist’s birth, on the first two floors of the Tolerance Center of the Vilna Gaon State Jewish Museum. In addition to fifty works already donated by the artist, the Museum will continue to accept works in the coming years and ultimately build a collection that spans the artist’s career. The Museum honors Bak’s life and art and is a testament to his commitment to educate current and future generations. Also in 2017, Samuel Bak was nominated by the Vilna Gaon State Jewish Museum, and subsequently named by the city’s mayor as an Honorary Citizen of Vilnius. He is only the 15th person to receive this honor, joining Ronald Reagan and Shimon Peres for their exceptional contributions to Lithuania.

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Chantal Zakari: Cogent Message
Feb
27
to Mar 31

Chantal Zakari: Cogent Message

February 27-March 31, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, March 1, 2019, 5:00-8:00 pm

It has not been a good decade for small, private liberal arts colleges, religious universities, art schools, and other specialized institutions of higher education. Clayton Christensen of the Harvard Business School's "disruptive innovation" theory suggests that the cause of this change is due to online and hybrid learning which now accounts for nearly half of the classroom hours that colleges and universities are delivering. But that might not be the only reason. Prospective students prefer public colleges and bigger universities which offer larger financial aid options. And Trump's xenophobic immigration policies initiated a decline in the enrollment of international students who have traditionally been relied upon to pay full tuition.

Chantal Zakari's new work hails from the future with nostalgic postcards of recently defunct colleges. In the images of crumbling campus buildings, once icons of American academic life, learning and research are at risk. Through the use of a rough halftone pattern the images blur and disintegrate into a painterly abstraction of a bygone era.

This collection of postcards includes stories about Alliance College which is now a state prison, Virginia Intermont College whose campus has been bought by a Chinese university, and the local news of Mt. Ida College that has become embroiled in a feud about how public funds should be spent. We are a long way from the mid-19th century when the wealthy took pride in philanthropy to found schools such as Morriston College which was dedicated to the education of former slaves.

In Cogent Message, also the title of an encyclopedic photobook in the show, idyllic images retrieved from schools' marketing campaigns emerge from the white background of the corporate style letterheads. Interspersed with school logos we see part time faculty who barely make ends meet, students starting life in-debt and staff that suddenly find themselves unemployed.

In line with her earlier work, Strategic Planning, also shown at Kingston Gallery, Cogent Message is a souvenir postcard rack of a fragile landscape.

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Jennifer Moses: Ghost not Ghost
Feb
27
to Mar 31

Jennifer Moses: Ghost not Ghost

February 27-March 31, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, March 1, 2019, 5:00-8:00 pm

My thoughts are haunted...

In the paintings included in this exhibition, I am using the ghosts of paintings past as a point of departure for paintings present. Sometimes recognizable and sometimes abstract, these images are made of newly added fragments of color and shape that interact with the sanded and scraped surfaces of the past. The works are haunted by trickster ghouls, squiggly jokesters that move in and out of the ether. These phantoms bump up against each other, step on each other's toes and march through the picture plane with legs akimbo, fists raised.

Also included in this exhibition are wall collages. These large-scale collages, like the paintings, are made from fragments of shapes and images, creating an ephemeral world of colliding forms; imagery glimpsed and imagery blocked. Unbound by the rectangle and free of the traditions of oil painting, the collages provide respite from the excavated and worked painted surfaces. They are direct and mutable.

Whether painted or cut this work is an exorcism of the ghosts rattling in my thoughts - some that leap with glee, high rollers, and some that rattle chains.

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Jules Aarons & Jack Lueders-Booth @ Gallery Kayafas
Feb
1
to Feb 23

Jules Aarons & Jack Lueders-Booth @ Gallery Kayafas

Jules Aarons - West End & North End c. 1947-70

Jack Lueders Booth - Chinatown to Jamaica Plain

February 1 - February 23, 2019

Artist Reception: Friday, February 1st 5:30-8:00pm

Jules Aarons and Jack Lueders-Booth photographed in Boston during times of great change – before the division of the West End and later with the removal of the Elevated. 

Their images serve as important historical documents depicting the personalities of the people, the diversity in the neighborhoods, and the energy of the streets. 

These times and places have been preserved through memories and film.

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Jan
30
to Feb 24

Emily Brodrick: What We Choose to Keep

January 30-February 24, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, February 1, 2019, 5:00-8:00 pm

My current works are collections of materials, patterns, forms and memories. My way of bringing my more rural roots into my current city life. As a child I would visit my Nonna's house on Shelter Island and my brothers and I would pick up treasures on the beach. Shells, crab claws, pieces of seaweed—and when we were lucky—an intact horseshoe crab. When we would get home we'd organize these objects into little, curated shrines to the sea.

This series is a reflection of these experiences and, in a sense, a continuation of that process of shrine-making; an homage to nature, but also to the memory of growing up in it. Acrylic paint, cut paper, ceramics and handspun yarn are formed into highly-detailed images and shapes that evoke living organisms. On multiple levels, this series embodies a yearning for a more "real" way of living as organic patterns and forms are coupled with traditionally considered craft media to create installations that evoke the past, both recent and distant.

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Jan
30
to Feb 24

Hilary Tolan: Emerge

January 30-February 24, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, February 1, 2019, 5:00-8:00 pm

I want to take you on a journey into this forest. It is a dense place, filled with an abundance of growth. Tangles of branches and masses of rhododendron leaves at times completely fill a given space. Lush, deep greens dominate; the reddish bark of branches and limbs exist alongside hints of water and sky that appear occasionally. An image of a meandering branch emerges to become a line. An incised line first appears as negative space and then shifts and seems as if it is now drawn. A pop and flash of light bleaches out color on a branch, washing out clusters of leaves and deepening shadows. An inky darkness, mimicking nighttime, contrasts with the brightly illuminated surfaces. Sometimes the light we see is actual daylight recorded; at others it is artificial light manipulating the scene, variously flattening the space or deepening it, pushing it further back from us. Can you tease out this space, understand it, what you are perceiving, seeing or not seeing? There is a sense of mystery here, of images revealed while simultaneously they are obscured and manipulated.

Photographs of dense forests are countered by ethereal spare pencil drawings of plants requiring up close viewing to discern the delicate lines. Color is pared all the way back solely to graphite and white gouache appears but once. It feels as if a distillation of sorts is happening. The images of an everyday weed become portrait-like and you must slow down to truly see the whole of the image and to be with this subtle likeness. The drawings exist on frosted mylar which hints at breath or atmosphere. As they emerge from this transparent ground, we may be reminded of the plants ephemeral nature. To slow down your pace will allow you to absorb the stillness and intricacy offered in each image.

So come with me on a meandering walk through this forest. Slow down, take in this space, be with this feeling of going inward to the quiet self and into this quiet mysterious land.

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Li Hongwei: Inner Reflection, Outward Transformation, and Saul Steinberg: Selected Works
Jan
11
to Mar 3

Li Hongwei: Inner Reflection, Outward Transformation, and Saul Steinberg: Selected Works

Public Opening

Saturday, 9 February 2019, 3:00PM - 6:00PM.
Li Hongwei will attend the public opening. Kindly RSVP to the event on Eventbrite.com.

Artist Biographies

Li Hongwei is a Chinese sculptor who currently works and lives in Beijing and New York. He earned degrees at two preeminent art schools: The Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing (BFA in sculpture, 2005) and Alfred University in Alfred, New York (MFA in ceramic art, 2007). He subsequently taught and published in both China and the United States. In 2015, he was invited to lecture as a visiting artist at Harvard University. He is a member of the International Academy of Ceramics (Geneva), the Chinese Sculpture Institute (Beijing), and the Taylor Foundation (established in 1844; Paris).

Li Hongwei’s works have been collected by: The British Museum, London; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Art Institute of Chicago; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; The Alfred Ceramic Art Museum, NY; China APEC International Conference Center; The San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts, Texas; and others. Over the years, his works have been exhibited in: The National Art Museum of China; The Louvre; The Art Institute of Chicago; The Fox Art Gallery of the University of Pennsylvania; and the Dublin Castle in Ireland, among others. In 2013, he was awarded the Taylor Prize by the 2013 France International Salon.

Saul Steinberg was an acclaimed graphic artist whose ever-evolving style represented the rapid changes in post-war life during the 20th-century. Early in his career, Steinberg studied architecture and contributed cartoons to Italian newspapers such as Bertoldo and Settebello, until anti-Semitic laws in fascist Italy forced him to flee. In 1942, he came to the United States where he began his nearly six-decades-long career creating cartoons and covers for The New Yorker, such as the famous 1976 cover View of the World from 9th Avenue. Gaining traction in the art world, Steinberg also exhibited in international galleries and museums, including a landmark exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art alongside Arshile Gorky, Isamu Noguchi, and Robert Motherwell.

Steinberg defined drawing as “a way of reasoning on paper,” an idea he constantly explored in new visual territories of drawings, paintings, collages, murals, and sculptures. Through a wide range of media, Steinberg often combined several styles into a single piece of art as a way to expose the imbalance between artifice and authenticity in modern life. Either ironically or affectionately, but always with a bit of humor, Steinberg’s complex art blends reality with the absurd, depicting the nuances in art and civilization.

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Kingston Associates: Pushing Forward
Jan
3
to Jan 27

Kingston Associates: Pushing Forward

January 3-27, 2019
Opening Reception: Friday, January 4, 2019, 5:00-8:00 pm

Press Release

To make art involves a push: tools on surfaces, hands on materials, minds on ideas. As artists, we push into next steps and unknown territory, and we push against deadlines. We push ourselves to make a thing we haven't seen before, and then bring it forward to be seen by others. Make a thing, make a change, make a decision, make another change; but the clock is ticking and it moves in one direction, so push on, push ahead, find a way to stay in motion. Pushing forward can be exhausting. It can also be exhilarating.

A push can be sustained, a resistance against pressure—whether it comes from our own lives, or from the world with its always-breaking news. It can be explosive: a destructive push opening up potential in a process that has stalled. It can be curious—lifting corners, investigating edges, quietly determined to find something of value. Things can be pushed together to make something better, newer, stranger. Things can be pushed apart to reveal what is hidden. A push, at its simplest, transmits energy.

At the start of a new year, the Associate Members of Kingston Gallery are energized: exploring, discovering, responding, and transmitting. We invite you to join us in Pushing Forward.

Image: Steven Cabral

Friendship, gouache and graphite on paper, 22 x 30 inches, 2018.

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11:11 The Depth of Perception
Jan
2
to Jan 27

11:11 The Depth of Perception

A National Juried Show
Jurors: Karina Kelley & Bill Stelling, Kelley Stelling Contemporary, NH

What do you see when you close your eyes?

11:11–The Depth of Perception explores the concept of taking notice. For many people this action represents a single moment in time that encourages reflection and to focus one’s attention on the present. It can be viewed as the link between human and spirit; darkness and light; scarcity and abundance.

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David A. Lang: Flights of Fancy
Dec
12
to Jan 27

David A. Lang: Flights of Fancy

  • Boston Sculptors Gallery (map)
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The Boston Sculptors Gallery presents Flights of Fancy, an exhibition of sculpture by the late artist David A. Lang. Featuring a diverse range of work created throughout his career, the exhibition includes Lang’s signature kinetic pieces. Set off by motion detectors, the sculptures come to life when closely inspected by viewers. Flights of Fancy explores the whimsical, yet serious nature of an artist who preferred to describe his efforts as “accidentally profound.”

 Cunning wit and word play define much of the work. Wrapture presents an invisible body encased in a straight jacket with paper wings flapping above where a head should be. First Strike, a tongue in cheek reference to military action, features tiny American flags on match heads moving back and forth above a strip of sandpaper. Perhaps the most poignant works reference classical mythology. The well-worn boots in Odysseus and the wheeled contraption in Daedalus signify a creative journey, while gently undulating paper wings express flights of imagination that both amuse and inspire.    

Although Lang’s creative output was cut tragically short when his car collided with a deer in 2017, he enjoyed a long and successful career as both artist and educator. With degrees in biology and medical illustration from Harvard Medical School, Lang was a scientific illustrator in Harvard’s chemistry department before joining the art faculty at the Middlesex School in Concord, MA. The recipient of the Puffin Foundation grant and other awards, Lang exhibited venues including the Attleboro Museum of Art, Babson and Bentley Colleges, Clark University, Danforth Art, the DeCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, and the Boston Sculptors Gallery, where he was an active member for ? years. Lang’s monumental sculpture The Question Is the Answer is showcased at the Fuller Craft Museum as part of its permanent collection. 

 David A. Lang: Flights of Fancy runs concurrently with Jessica Straus: TransAtlantic. Please note that the gallery will be closed December 24, 2018 to January 1, 2019.

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Jessica Straus: TransAtlantic
Dec
12
to Jan 27

Jessica Straus: TransAtlantic

  • Boston Sculptors Gallery (map)
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Jessica Straus’s exhibition, TransAtlantic, travels to Boston Sculptors Gallery after its 2017 premier in Athis de L’Orne, France.  Originally commissioned as a site-specific installation for Le Temple Protestant, located in a region of Normandy that suffered heavy bombardment during World War II, TransAtlantic commemorates the long and strong alliance between France and the United States. The installation is both political and personal. Straus’ parents met as a result of her American father’s participation as a soldier in the Normandy invasion and subsequent march into Paris, where he met the artist’s mother, a French student.

For the installation at Boston Sculptors Gallery, the walls and floor will be clad in a room-sized World War II era map.  A fleet of airplanes and an ocean liner criss-cross the Atlantic Ocean carrying correspondence between the artist’s American and French families. Straus conceived of this work just as the Trump administration was coming into power, reacting with alarm to the disturbing new era of xenophobia and nationalistic supremacy. TransAtlantic serves as a reminder of the importance of alliances between nations and the possibilities that surface with openness to strangers.  

Straus has exhibited nationally and internationally at venues including deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Fuller Craft Museum, Danforth Museum in Massachusetts, Sculpture Center in Ohio, Brattleboro Museum in Vermont, New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut, Qorikancha Museum in Peru, and ArtTerritoire in France.

Jessica Straus: TransAtlantic runs concurrently with David A. Lang: Flights of Fancy. Please note that the gallery will be closed December 24, 2018 to January 1, 2019.

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Holiday Group Show
Dec
7
to Jan 31

Holiday Group Show

HOLIDAY GROUP SHOW

Holiday group show featuring artists, Sarah Meyers Brent, Betsy Podlach, Katina Huston, Cynthia Packard, Bernd Haussmann, Pamela Murphy, Nathalie Guarrancino and Peter Hoffer.

December 7, 2018 – January 31, 2019 

Opening Reception: Friday, December 7, 2018, 6–8 p.m.

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Haberl, Edgerton, & Ventimiglia @ Gallery Kayafas
Dec
7
to Jan 12

Haberl, Edgerton, & Ventimiglia @ Gallery Kayafas

Judy Haberl – The Chef’s Hand & Traces

Harold Edgerton – Rarities

August Ventimiglia – Recent Work

December 7, 2018  – January 12, 2019

Artists’ Receptions: Friday December 7th & January 4th, 5:30-8:00pm

Special Performances by the mother-daughter team of  Melinda Melina Pavlata and Zoë Isadora Heywood of Moody Street Circus.

Performances on Friday December 7th, at 7:00pm & 7:30pm

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Dec
1
3:00 PM15:00

Mark Davis and Cary Wolinsky Public Opening

Both artists will attend the public opening.

Mark Davis was educated at Goddard College in Vermont. He began making jewelry in his teens and his dexterous metalwork is entirely self-taught. Initial forays into mobiles utilized the metals of his jewelry making: sterling silver, gold plating, and brass. The variety of styles and materials that Davis uses to build his mobiles has expanded dramatically over the years to create a complex and compelling body of work. In addition to moderate scale pieces of movement, color, and grace, Davis also creates large scale public and private commission pieces. Davis' works are on display in numerous private and public collections including the University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital and the Rose Museum at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Cary Wolinsky worked as a news photographer for The Boston Globe in 1968 while completing a degree in photojournalism at Boston University. Soon after graduating, Wolinsky received assignments from national publications including Natural History, Smithsonian, Newsweek, and International Wildlife. In 1972, Wolinsky began his 35-year career as a National Geographic photographer, producing picture essays in Europe, Africa, Russia, Papua New Guinea, Australia, Peru, India, China, and Japan. His photographs have been published in books and magazines throughout the world. His photographic prints have been acquired by museums and private collectors in the United States, Europe, Australia and Asia. Wolinsky co-founded of the Center for Digital Imaging Arts at Boston University and TRIIIBE, an artists collaborative. Wolinsky now works with his son Yari, a filmmaker, and his wife Babs, a graphic designer, making documentary films. Their company, Trillium Studios Films (trilliumstudios.com) produced Raise the Roof (polishsynagogue.com), a feature-length documentary, about the reconstruction of an 18th century Polish wooden synagogue. The film has been featured at more than 150 film festivals and is currently being broadcast on public television stations across the US.

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Nov
28
to Dec 23

Breaking The Rules

BREAKING THE RULES

core artist group exhibition curated by Allison Maria Rodriguez

November 28 – December 23, 2018 

Opening Reception: Friday, December 7, 2018, 6–8 p.m.

Participatory Art Event:  Saturday, December 8, 2018, 2–4 p.m.
(this event is part of the Boston Art Dealers Association 2nd Saturday series)

Exhibiting artists include: Sarah Alexander, Jim Banks, Kathline Carr, Brenda Cirioni, Cheryl Clinton, Marie Craig, Mia Cross, Denise Driscoll, Sara Fine-Wilson, Tatiana Flis, Joseph Fontinha, Kay Hartung, Anita Loomis, Mary Marley, Vicki McKenna, Joel Moskowitz, Iris Osterman, Chris Plunkett, Chelsea Revelle, Allison Maria Rodriguez, Alexandra Rozenman, Rebecca Skinner, Gin Stone, Sylvia Vander Sluis, Marcia Wise, Daniel Zeese, Leslie Zelamsky and Shao Yuan Zhang

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154 Years of Serendipity @ Gallery Kayafas
Oct
19
to Dec 1

154 Years of Serendipity @ Gallery Kayafas

154 Years of Serendipity  

Roger Kizik & Clara Wainwright

 October 19  – December 1, 2018

Artists’ Receptions : Saturday October 20th 4:00-6:00pm & November 2nd  5:30-8:00pm

Please Join Us!  Saturday November 17th

2-4pm Mending the World Workshop with Clara Wainwright

4-6pm Special Gallery Conversation:
Nick Capasso, Phd., Director of Fitchburg Art Museum in conversation with Roger Kizik & Clara Wainwright

Friends for decades, Wainwright & Kizik have inspired each other’s work.   

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Emily Eveleth: Past Imperfect
Oct
19
to Nov 27

Emily Eveleth: Past Imperfect

  • Howard Yezerski Gallery (map)
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Emily Eveleth | Past Imperfect
On view from October 19  – November 27, 2018

New paintings by Eveleth invite the viewer to wonder, question, and decipher meaning through convocation of minimalist iconography, nonverbal communications, and unspecified environs. Ranging in scale from intimate nine inch square pieces to an enveloping seven by twelve foot painting, these phantasmal oil and gouache pieces invigorate the space with a metaphysical reality, utilizing themes of prestige, ambiguity, and how the self may be located in the world both topographically and metaphorically. Past Imperfect implies a looking back at history through the lens of the present- acknowledging that regardless of outcomes, there is no ‘perfect past’.

For more information and to view works in the show, please click HERE.

Emily Eveleth,  Congregants, Sanitized , oil and colored pen on mylar, 22.5 x 24.5 in, 2018

Emily Eveleth, Congregants, Sanitized, oil and colored pen on mylar, 22.5 x 24.5 in, 2018

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Ann Strassman & Daphne Confar @ Gallery Kayafas
Sep
7
to Oct 13

Ann Strassman & Daphne Confar @ Gallery Kayafas

My People - Daphne Confar
You Are There – Ann Strassman

September 7 – October 13, 2018

Artists’ Receptions : September 7 & October 5th  5:30-8:00pm

Two Massachusetts Painters Share Their Visions - Both artists paint from photographs, found or taken


We are pleased to be showing Daphne Confar’s, My People, her first exhibit in the gallery.  Confar’s paintings, oils on wood or paper, feel like snapshots found in a family album —individuals seen in their everyday lives, in ordinary settings doing ordinary things. 

This is Ann Strassman’s first solo exhibit with the gallery.  Painting from photographs she has taken of people on the street going about their everyday activities or of her glorious gardens, she brings to the viewer a sense of exuberance.  Using acrylics, she paints on cardboard appliance boxes and other cardboard containers which to others would be tossed or recycled.  Using the large format these boxes allow, her portraits are almost life-size. When sitting in the gallery, you are surrounded by strangers — and you, too, join the energy and activity of busy streets.  It’s all about the paint for Strassman… 

 
 
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